Moffam Electricals

Common CCTV Problems and how to fix them

Modern security systems often include CCTV cameras since they are both common and economical. However, the security assurances provided by a CCTV camera are only as good as the camera’s dependability and the quality of the footage it generates. Therefore, any CCTV problems should be handled carefully.

Even seemingly small flickering here and there can cover important features in a photo, such as a thief’s face or a car’s registration plate.

The fussy and trouble-prone CCTV cameras of thirty years ago are light-years behind the strong, user-friendly equipment of today. However, despite all the work manufacturers put into ensuring their products work properly without a lot of configuration, some issues still arise.

You don’t want to handle CCTV issues by yourself. We understand it! Our CCTV experts in Nairobi are available give us a call. and will resolve any issues quickly.

With any camera, this is to be considered. Even with top-notch equipment from renowned manufacturers, problems are inevitable. Numerous typical CCTV issues are merely indications of shoddy installation or bad setup.

Here are some of the most common CCTV problems  and how to fix them-

1 .My Camera’s Video is Choppy

common cctv problems and how to fix them

The presence of obvious tearing or choppy real-time video from your CCTV camera is typically an indication of a network issue.

If the network lacks the necessary capacity, video from IP cameras will appear choppy. Typically, analogue video transmissions don’t become choppy on their own.

Flickering, noise, or blackouts are signs that there is a connectivity issue. Regardless of its source, a slow network can cause the video output of NVR or network-connected DVR boxes to choppy.

Some of the things you can check are:

-make sure your network is fast enough to carry a video feed at the resolution and quality levels currently in use and check the video settings on your camera. 8 Mbps of bandwidth is needed per camera for a 4 MP, H.264-encoded video feed.

-Check the signal strength in the area where the wireless CCTV camera is located if the footage is choppy. It is not sufficient for the camera to be near a Wi-Fi hotspot since RF interference can drown out the Wi-Fi signal, causing poor speeds and frequent disconnects.

-Check any cables (particularly the shielding) for damage if you have a wired CCTV camera, NVR, or DVR, and ensure sure the cable you are using is suitable for the length of the device. Gigabit signals, for instance, can only travel 100 meters over a Cat-6 connection. Ensure that the cable is run far from any interference sources.

-Check the network connection and decoding capacity of your NVR. If the video stream is larger than your NVR can handle during decoding, some frames may be skipped and lost, causing choppy, jerky motion. Some of the frames may be lost in transit if there is a network connection issue, which again leads to choppy films.

2 .My CCTV Camera Is Not Working on Mobile

My CCTV Camera Is Not Working on Mobile

The good news is that there’s typically nothing wrong with the camera or its equipment if you can access the video feed locally but not the CCTV stream on your mobile app. Other than strange issues like switch network ports that aren’t working properly, it’s usually just a configuration issue.

However, since mobile access to CCTV camera streams is still a relatively new technology, there aren’t any industry-wide approved standards. Therefore, a lot of issues are vendor- and application-specific. But before you begin to think that it’s a flaw with your particular camera.

some of thing you need to check are-

-Ensure that all necessary settings are established correctly and that your camera, DVR, or NVR is connected to the local network. Make sure the necessary netmask, gateway, and DNS addresses are set up if your camera or DVR has a static IP address.

-Check to see if your network firewall is preventing connections from the camera to the Internet if your camera allows mobile access via a cloud-based application.

-Make sure the VPN service is properly configured if remote and/or mobile access to your CCTV system requires a VPN connection.

-settings are established properly if your CCTV system provides remote/cloud access via a dynamic DNS (DDNS) service. It’s also important to keep in mind that DDNS might not function properly on all networks and setups, particularly 4G networks.

3 .My CCTV Camera’s DVR is Not Recording Anything

My CCTV Camera’s DVR is Not Recording Anything

Ensure that all necessary settings are established correctly and that your camera, DVR, or NVR is connected to the local network. If your CCTV camera is operational but your DVR is not recording anything, common causes include incorrect configuration, a lack of available storage, and defective DVR parts. Don’t lose hope; current DVR units are remarkably user-friendly and troubleshootable.

some of things you need to check are-

  • Verify that recording is turned on. Although it may seem obvious, it does happen. The DVR box might stop recording without your knowledge if you reset a device to its factory defaults or if the settings were corrupted and restored automatically.
  • The hard drive in your DVR might be malfunctioning. Your DVR might still function even if it can no longer save footage because many DVRs include a small, on-board Flash storage for their firmware and only use the hard disk for recording.
  • Make sure recording is either permanently enabled or enabled for the duration of the troubleshooting process by checking your CCTV and DVR settings. Some devices can be set up to exclusively capture video at specific intervals.
  • Make that the recording media in your DVR has enough room for storing. Delete any old video you don’t require.
  • Check your DVR’s network connectivity if it uploads footage to a network server or a cloud account. It might have run out of local storage.

4 .At night, my camera displays deteriorated images.

At night, my camera displays deteriorated images.

There are a few things you can do if your CCTV camera is operational but the images are worsened at night.

-Make sure your camera is pointed away from sources of bright light if you occasionally get pictures that are entirely white or appear to be overexposed in some places. In low ambient light, the headlights of an automobile, for instance, can overwhelm the CCD sensor, rendering the camera ineffective and only displaying a big, white mass.

-Make sure the camera’s visor adequately covers the lens if you get white spots on your image, and make sure the camera is not pointed at or near a glass window. Otherwise, the light emanating from a camera’s own IR LEDs or those of surrounding cameras could degrade the image.

5 . My CCTV Camera Isn’t Working at Night

The IR LEDs are often malfunctioning if your CCTV camera is designed for night use yet all you see at night is a dark image.

-misconfigured camera. Ensure that your camera is set up to function at night. Check any ambient light configuration settings if the camera is a day-and-night model that is supposed to automatically transition to night mode.

-inadequate power. A CCTV camera uses more electricity at night than it does during the day because the LEDs draw more current. Particularly with battery- and PoE-powered cameras, this issue is prevalent. Ensure that the power needs of your CCTV camera are met.

-broken LEDs. Look for any damage to the camera. A deteriorating camera might simply be unable to produce enough light because LEDs deteriorate over time.

6 . My CCTV Camera Shows a Black Screen

My CCTV Camera Shows a Black Screen

There is a strong likelihood that the DVR box or the monitoring application can’t receive a video signal if your CCTV camera doesn’t display any images and all you see is a black screen. Look over the procedures above to be certain.

Here are some things you can check if that doesn’t work or if you have cause to believe that a video signal is actually present but is only transmitting a completely black image:

-Make sure the optical route is not blocked. This might not be immediately apparent; for instance, small lenses with high zoom capabilities are easily obscured by branches or leaves.

-Make sure that your CCTV camera’s ambient illumination requirements are met. Not all cameras have the ability to view at night or in a room that is not illuminated. You’ll only get a black image if the light levels are below the camera’s threshold.

-Turn your camera on and off once more. Restart the DVR box if none of the cameras not just one show anything but a blank screen. Modern DVR boxes and some cameras, especially highly expensive ones, can crash much like PCs can. They are essentially miniature computers.

-Inspect the camera and lens for damage. A camera may still function and convey data if its optical parts or sensor are broken, but it won’t be able to take pictures.

7 . No Video Signal

No Video Signal

The good news is that there’s typically nothing wrong with the camera or its equipment if you can access the video feed locally but not the CCTV stream on your mobile app. Other than strange issues like switch network ports that aren’t working properly, it’s usually just a configuration issue.

However, since mobile access to CCTV camera streams is still a relatively new technology, there aren’t any industry-wide approved standards. Therefore, a lot of issues are vendor- and application-specific. But before you begin to think that it’s a flaw with your particular camera.

some of thing you need to check are-

-Ensure that all necessary settings are established correctly and that your camera, DVR, or NVR is connected to the local network. Make sure the necessary netmask, gateway, and DNS addresses are set up if your camera or DVR has a static IP address.

-Check to see if your network firewall is preventing connections from the camera to the Internet. if your camera allows mobile access via a cloud-based application.

-Make sure the VPN service is properly configured if remote and/or mobile access to your CCTV system requires a VPN connection.

  • -settings are established properly if your CCTV system provides remote/cloud access via a dynamic DNS (DDNS) service. It’s also important to keep in mind that DDNS might not function properly on all networks and setups, particularly 4G networks.

By far, the most annoying CCTV issue is this one. For a while, you can put up with noise or flickering, but what if you can’t even obtain a picture?


There are several ways that this issue presents itself:

Make sure your camera is powered properly. Although it might seem obvious, we have all been bitten by this. Even seasoned security engineers will occasionally come to the embarrassing realization that a CCTV camera is not powered on because it is not receiving a video feed.

First and foremost, make sure the power connectors and cables are plugged in and in good condition. Make that the external power brick on your CCTV camera is functional if it has one. Try using a test cord and power source to turn on your CCTV camera if you have access to that kind of equipment.

-Check the fuse box if your CCTV camera is connected to the mains or if it is connected via a CCTV power supply with a fuse box.If your camera is PoE-capable, make sure the camera is actually receiving power by checking the PoE switch.

Check the video or data connection on your camera. If your CCTV camera is on but you can’t see anything, it’s possible that the images aren’t getting to the monitor.

Check the cord and the connectors on both ends if your camera is connected to a DVR box. Ensure they are intact and properly plugged in. In this instance, a CCTV test monitor can be useful.

Check the network settings if your camera is IP-enabled. Check the cord and connectors for damage if the camera is wired.

-Verify any additional network or visual hardware. Check the functionality of any network switches, routers, DVRs, or video multiplexers that your CCTV camera links to.

Verify the CCTV software. You can disable some cameras’ access or password-protect some streams using sophisticated video surveillance software. Check to see whether you can really see the stream you’re looking for if that’s the case.

-Examine the camera for any damage. We’ve hit the end of the road. It’s time to make sure there are no issues with the camera itself if the camera is correctly turned on and there are no connectivity issues. Make that the optical path is clear and that the lens and any protective domes are in tact. The next best course of action is to contact the manufacturer for tech help if the camera exhibits no apparent physical side affects of damage.

8 . My CCTV Camera Footage is Noisy

Electrical or RF interference frequently causes noisy CCTV images. 

You should check and eliminate common sources of interference, just like with flickering:

  • In particular, look for damage to analog video cables and connectors. Ensure that all wires are installed properly, away from sources of interference, and, if necessary, correctly grounded.
  • Disconnect the video cord from the camera if your camera has an analogue output and examine whether there is still noise on your monitor. Check the monitor’s power supply and wires because that typically means there is interference at that end.
  • See whether turning off any other cameras or video equipment lowers the noise level. Equipment that is harmed or not insulated adequately can interfere with other gadgets.

9 . There Are Horizontal Lines on My CCTV Video

There Are Horizontal Lines on My CCTV Video

Horizontal lines on CCTV footage might make it challenging to detect minute details and prevent employees from keeping an eye on practical areas for extended periods of time.

The good news is that there are only two common primary causes: electrical interference or interference from ambient lights. The bad news is that it can be challenging to diagnose the latter.

The solutions to these issues are as follows:

  • Ensure that the camera is not directly illuminated by any electrical sources. Bright lights and various electrical light sources can cause flickering or horizontal lines in CCTV footage by interfering with single-chip CCD sensors.
  • If you can, examine the power supply for damage and confirm that it has sufficient power filtering. The equipment it is powering may pick up interference from the electrical network if the power source is faulty or insufficient. This ultimately causes interference with the CCD sensor, which can lead to distortions like horizontal lines on CCTV images.
  • Look for shielding damage on the cables.
  • Make sure all wires are properly routed if you’re utilizing extremely long cables, Cat 5 cables, or coaxial cables. Make sure all cables are grounded properly, that they are not touching any electrical equipment, and that they are routed away from high-frequency devices like satellite transmitters.
  • You can consider employing a WDR (Wide Dynamic Range) camera or a CMOS sensor camera if illumination is the issue rather than electrical interference and you are unable to eliminate it. However, it’s wise to exhaust all other options before considering purchasing new equipment.

10 . My CCTV Video Is Flickering

Flickering on CCTV can be challenging to deal with because it can happen randomly. In rare circumstances, interference—due to improper installation, broken equipment or power sources, or poor environmental conditions—causes CCTV video to flicker. Insufficient powering is a common reason as well, frequently as a result of poor installation or design.

First, a word of caution: while interference sources can be challenging to locate, resolving CCTV flickering and interference issues in general requires patience. You should keep watching the video even if the issue is resolved because the flickering could come and go.

What you can do is:

  • Make sure the issue is not with the monitor by performing a preliminary check. Make sure the display is functioning properly if you only notice flickering on one particular monitor and only when it is in full-screen mode.
  • Examine the insulation on your wires and connectors, especially, for any damage. Make sure the wires are properly grounded and routed, especially if your CCTV camera has an analog output or if you are utilizing extremely long connections.
  • Disconnect the video wire at the camera output to see if the video flickers even when there is no video signal if your camera has an analog output. Check the monitor’s power source, cables, and connectors for damage if the flickering persists. This suggests that the video signal is clear and that the monitor is the source of the flickering.
  • A loop-through device with additional video outputs may be used to connect your camera. Ensure that all of the additional video outputs are terminated properly.
  • Make sure the power supply is sufficient for your camera’s needs if your CCTV camera merely flickers at night. CCTV that flickers in low-light environments is frequently caused by the IR LEDs themselves flashing, which frequently occurs when the power supply is insufficient. The LEDs in cameras need more power. When it’s dark, it’s typical for CCTV cameras, especially PoE cameras, to consume more power than your installation can provide.
  • Make sure your CCTV camera is pointing away from electrical light sources if it only flickers at night. The image may briefly flicker while the camera adjusts its infra-red LEDs in response to sudden changes in lighting, such as abrupt increases and decreases in lighting caused by cars passing by. If so, changing the camera’s angle can also be helpful.
  • See if stopping any cameras or recording devices stops the flickering. If that’s the case and your setup satisfies the power requirements for your CCTV cameras, examine the apparatus for damage. Damaged video recorders or cameras may interfere with other technology.
  • Ensure that your camera and all other equipment can operate at 50 hertz. The majority of equipment is designed to operate at both 50 and 60 hertz, however some power supplies and PoE switches demand that you manually select the operating mode via a physical switch or a configuration option.
  • Last but not least, look for damage to your camera, particularly to the IR LEDs. Because IR light is invisible to the human eye, all that is viewable is flickering video while an LED is flickering. Cameras that are old or damaged may naturally flicker, especially if the LEDs or the light sensors are broken.

 

 

 

11. I Only Get Black and White Images

I Only Get Black and White Images

Black-and-white film from color CCTV cameras is frequently produced of few reasons.

Only in the presence of sufficient ambient lighting can CCTV cameras “see” colors.

Infrared LEDs are used to illuminate the scene in cameras that are rated for nighttime operation (“see in the dark” cameras) in order to capture images in low-intensity ambient lighting. However, infrared light impairs their ability to discriminate between colors.

Therefore, when it’s dark, even a color CCTV camera will capture black and white images. Even in low ambient illumination settings, some high-end cameras have limited capabilities for color output, but that won’t go you very far.

This is how to resolve the issue :

  • Make sure the ambient lighting meets the specifications of your CCTV camera. If they don’t, before switching the camera, you might consider adding more light sources.
  • Check for damage to the camera and ensure the optical path is clear if there is enough ambient light.
  • Make sure that the input and output video types match if your camera produces analogue, composite, or component video signals. If you plug a composite video signal into a component video input or vice versa, you could occasionally get a blank screen instead of a black image. Some displays only have one set of video inputs, which must be manually configured and set to the appropriate mode.

A test monitor may be helpful in this situation; if the test monitor displays a color image, the camera is probably in working order. The best course of action may be to contact the camera manufacturer for assistance if the illumination is optimal and there are no connectivity issues.

2 thoughts on “Most Common CCTV Problems and how to fix them in Kenya.”

Leave a Comment

Chat With Us
Scan the code
call us now